Friday, 24 June 2011

Introduction to Desktop Publishing

Introduction to Desktop Publishing

desktop publishing Introduction to Desktop PublishingDesktop publishing takes WYSIWYG page layout software and combines it with a personal computer to allow the user to self-publish their own publications whether for high amounts of publishing or for small, mini-publications. However, desktop publishing doesn't just mean page layout skills needed to make a book; it can also be used to describe the design and creation of point of sale displays, outside signs and other promotional items.

Types of Pages in Desktop Publishing

The most important aspect to consider when desktop publishing is the type of page that is going to be used. The first is known as an electronic page otherwise known as a web page. This page goes on forever and therefore, requires no set parameters on what the page width and length needs to be. When a web page is printed, the content automatically scales in size to ensure that it fits on the printer. Because of this, there isn't very much "design" in regard to how the page layout looks.
On the other hand, the second page type is known as a virtual page which is intended to be printed. These require paper parameters. These parameters must meet up with the international standard physical paper sizes. For example, one of the most common page sizes is the A4 or the letter. It's what most printers hold. However, there are numerous other types of pages as well that fit within this standard of physical paper sizes.
Many desktop publishing programs, fortunately, allow for the user to set custom parameters to the paper in case they are trying to print something much larger than what fits within the physical paper size standards. Therefore, the user can print things such as billboards and signs.

Release history

Release history

Name Version Number[5] Release Date[6] Included in Office packages

1.0 1991

2.0 1993
Publisher for Windows 95 3.0 1995
Microsoft Publisher 97 8.0 1996 Small Business Edition
Microsoft Publisher 98 8.5 1998 Small Business Edition 2.0
Microsoft Publisher 2000 9.0 1999 Small Business Edition, Professional, Premium, Developer
Microsoft Publisher 2002 10.0 2001 Professional OEM, Professional Special Edition
Microsoft Office Publisher 2003 11.0 2003 Small Business, Professional, Professional Plus, Enterprise
Microsoft Office Publisher 2007 12.0 2006 Small Business, Professional, Ultimate, Professional Plus, Enterprise
Microsoft Publisher 2010 14.0 2010 Standard, Professional, Professional Plus

Desktop video

Desktop video

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
An Amiga 2000 desktop video system. The CPU unit is to the right with the monitor sitting on a VCR.
Desktop video refers to a phenomenon lasting from the mid-1980s to the early 1990s when the graphics capabilities of personal computers such as Commodore's Amiga, the Apple Macintosh II and specially-upgraded IBM PC compatibles had advanced to the point where individuals and local broadcasters could use them for analog non-linear editing and vision mixing in video producti] Description
There were multiple models of genlock cards available to synchronise the content; the Newtek Video Toaster was commonly used in Amiga and PC systems, while Mac systems had the SuperMac Video Spigot and Radius VideoVision cards. Apple later introduced the Macintosh Quadra 840AV and Centris 660AV systems to specifically address this market.
Desktop video was a parallel development to desktop publishing and enabled many small production houses and local TV stations to produce their own original content for the first time. Desktop video meant that television advertising on Public-access television, which had not been affordable before, became possible for local businesses such as real estate agents, contractors and auto dealers. As with the phrase desktop publishing, use of the term died out as the technologies it referred to became the norm for any kind of video production.

Terminology

Terminology

There are two types of pages in desktop publishing, electronic pages and virtual paper pages to be printed on physical paper pages. All computerized documents are technically electronic, which are limited in size only by computer memory or computer data storage space.
Virtual paper pages will ultimately be printed, and therefore require paper parameters that coincide with international standard physical paper sizes such as "A4," "letter," etc., if not custom sizes for trimming. Some desktop publishing programs allow custom sizes designated for large format printing used in posters, billboards and trade show displays. A virtual page for printing has a predesignated size of virtual printing material and can be viewed on a monitor in WYSIWYG format. Each page for printing has trim sizes (edge of paper) and a printable area if bleed printing is not possible as is the case with most desktop printers.
A web page is an example of an electronic page that is not constrained by virtual paper parameters. Most electronic pages may be dynamically re-sized, causing either the content to scale in size with the page or causing the content to re-flow.
Master pages are templates used to automatically copy or link elements and graphic design styles to some or all the pages of a multipage document. Linked elements can be modified without having to change each instance of an element on pages that use the same element. Master pages can also be used to apply graphic design styles to automatic page numbering.

History

History

Desktop publishing began in 1985 with the introduction of MacPublisher, the first WYSIWYG layout program, which ran on the original 128K Macintosh computer. (Desktop typesetting, with only limited page makeup facilities, had arrived in 1978–9 with the introduction of TeX, and was extended in the early 1980s by LaTeX.) The DTP market exploded in 1985 with the introduction in January of the Apple LaserWriter printer, and later in July with the introduction of PageMaker software from Aldus which rapidly became the DTP industry standard software.
Before the advent of desktop publishing, the only option available to most persons for producing typed (as opposed to handwritten) documents was a typewriter, which offered only a handful of typefaces (usually fixed-width) and one or two font sizes. Indeed, one popular desktop publishing book was actually titled The Mac is not a typewriter.[1] The ability to create WYSIWYG page layouts on screen and then print pages containing text and graphical elements at crisp 300 dpi resolution was revolutionary for both the typesetting industry and the personal computer industry. Newspapers and other print publications made the move to DTP-based programs from older layout systems like Atex and other such programs in the early 1980s.

Desktop publishing

Desktop publishing

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Scribus, an open source desktop publishing application
Desktop publishing (also known as DTP) combines a personal computer and WYSIWYG page layout software to create publication documents on a computer for either large scale publishing or small scale local multifunction peripheral output and distribution.
The term "desktop publishing" is commonly used to describe page layout skills. However, the skills and software are not limited to paper and book publishing. The same skills and software are often used to create graphics for point of sale displays, promotional items, trade show exhibits, retail package designs and outdoor signs